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Nível Fluente › The History of Gospel Music

REMIND OF/ABOUT
Dialog: "
African Americans didn't want to be reminded of that difficult time in their history."

The verb "remind" means to put in mind.  When paired with the preposition "of" it means to cause somebody to remember.  When paired with the preposition "about" it means to tell somebody not to forget something.

 

1) REMIND OF

  • You remind me of a girl that I once knew.
  • Every time I speak to Tania I'm always reminded of my college days.
  • São Paulo doesn't remind Melissa at all of New York.

 

2) REMIND ABOUT

  • Make sure you remind Mark about the dinner party on Friday night.
  • I put a post-it note on my computer to remind myself about the meeting tomorrow.
  • You don't have to remind me about that night. I'll never forget it!

 

NOTE: Many people who learn English get confused as to the difference between "remind" and "remember". You always remind yourself or someone else something that was forgotten or could be forgotten.  Whereas remember is to bring back a piece of information into your mind, or keep it in your memory.

  • Will you remind me to call Jessica when we get home? (tell me so that I don't forget)
  • I remember when I was a kid I used to say "cumbercue" instead of "cucumber". (keep in my memory)
  • I must remember to turn off the lights before I leave. (bring back a piece of information)

 

IF YOU REMIND SOMEONE OF SOMETHING THEY WILL REMEMBER IT!

Sobre esta aula

"There will be peace in the valley for me some day. There will be peace in the valley for me, oh Lord, I pray. There’ll be no sadness, no sorrow, no trouble I see. There will be peace in the valley for me!"  Nothing like a classic gospel song by Thomas A. Dorsey to lift one’s spirits!  In today’s lesson Ashley and Josh talk about this uniquely American music that’s loved by all, no matter what their creed or color.

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